How To Be Memorable with Janet Murray

 

Powerful storytelling can make journalists fall in love with you. A memorable brand can help you stand out from the crowd. No one knows this better than Janet Murray, a PR coach based in London who helps people tell their story and get coverage in publications around the world.

In this episode you’ll discover:

  • Tips on training your brain for good content
  • The #1 thing people are doing wrong with their PR
  • How to be an expert at anything

Episode  Soundbites:

9:57, “The main thing that people do wrong in their PR is that they try to tell the stories that they want to tell rather than the stories that people want to hear. If there’s just one thing that I can urge people to stop doing, it’s just that. You need to put what journalist want first. It’s all about pleasing them and giving them great content. They don’t care about you, they don’t care about your business, they don’t care if you need help with your startup…. When that clicks for people that’s when they really excel…”

11:40, “The best tip I give to people [on training your brain to making good content] is to look around the edges of your business or brand…”

17:00: “This is what I always say to people about PR: If you are good at it and you know what you’re doing it can be just as simple as replying to an email or making a quick phone call.”

18:06, (Phil) “Even if you don’t think you’re an expert; throw your name in and research the heck out of it and lean on others [to get a perspective].”

19:22, (Phil) “Rather than saying, ‘I don’t know the answer to that’, answer what you know because their questions aren’t going to make the article; your answers will. If your answer is what you know, it’ll trigger something else.”

19:57, (Phil) you’re in control of the answers. Sometimes you don’t know all the nitty-gritty of the questions, but you’re in control of what you say to them and that’s what they have to work with.

20:09, “You have to be the go-to person. When people think of you they need to think of one word, maximum 3 words.”